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assumed. guest: we are in non-partisan grass-roots organization devoted to educating the public about fiscal issues. guest: if we go over the cliff, it is not the end of the discussion. it is important people and not lose hope -- that people not lose hope for justice in what happens by midnight is the end of the discussion. the discussions will go on. i am relatively sure if we do not have a deal by december 31, there will be one in january. the damage to the economy would be too great. the public outcry will be significant i will be looking at the dow and s&p. those will get daily responses. host: we can talk more about the deals down the road. let's go to louann on the republican line. caller: to me, the fiscal cliff is a small smokescreen. the fiscal cliff that is coming is obamacare. nobody is addressing obamacare. i have to find out friday will be taxed 2.3% on any device used on us in any of the medical fields. my husband's doctor wrote out a prescription for a blood drop for january. he said i do not know how much this will cost you out of pocket because of obamacare. my husban
clark oposian, whose group put on the education, and dennis vac rockle p what are teachers telling you? >> they've had an emipiphany of sorts. the only training so far has lock the doors and hide behind the desk. we need to give them another option. we had about 200 teachers, other school employees as well. >> you've down this a long time. what percentage after the training end up getting guns. >> some of them already have firearms. i don't know, but the majority of those that i still communicate with, they have their firearms and carrying in schools. >> listen to one teacher that went through the training. >> now, especially, i'm thinking this would be a great opportunity to probably the children, protect the classroom and the teachers if that opportunity arose. that's the reason i'm here. >> what's the reaction to that. they fair carrying concealed weapons inside schools. >> well, as a high school math teacher for 23 years, i can tell you that guns do not belong in schools, period. i believe this is a complex problem action and to suggest there is one solution, to put more guns in sc
with the organization. >> what are you going to be doing with them? >>i will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccolumn, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that somethi
in a position of accepting really unacceptable risks to our security, title 1 programs of education for low-income children will be cut dramatically, most people, including the congressional budget office, our own congressional budget office, say that the combination of tax increases along with the decreased spending required under the budget control act will push our economy back into recession in the new year. so i don't agree that no deal is better than a bad deal. in this case, i repeat, no deal is the worst deal because it allows our country to go over the fiscal cliff and really hurts almost every american family in our country, in our economy, as a whole. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. it's not as if, if i could use the metaphor, that congress was going along in a bus and -- on a ride through the country and suddenly came to the end of the road and there was a cliff. this shouldn't be a surprise to us. we -- we -- we created this cliff ourselves a year and a half ago when we adopted the budget control act. and we created it for a very good reason: because we knew that we had pro
, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that there are any eggal benefits. -- educational benefits. but i think it's also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is leaning this way, that even if there are some educational went fits -- benefits, they've got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination, right? i mean, something as compelling, something, if an interest is compelling, you've got to consider the inherent liabilities in the racial discriminatio
question, lots of answers. about 200 educators in utah are mulling that over today after attending classes on firearm use and safety. the course of geared toward teachers. instructors are not trying to persuade teachers to carry guns in schools, but to provide the information and training they need in the wake of the newtown massacre. the classes have been going on for some time and some teachers are sold on the idea of arming themselves. others simply want to explore their options. >> i think it's important to have protection because if you don't have it, i feel like we're sitting ducks. >> we're going to help them understand where their moral code and value system really is. until they discover that, they are not prepared to carry a firearm. >> utah already allows teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been shoved to his death from a subway platform in new york city. it happened last night in queens. police and witnesses say a woman who had been pacing and mumbling pushed a man in front of the number 7 train before running down two f
tax cuts for people under $250,000. but it will include the education tax credit and the child tax credit and the earned income tax credit. these are refundable tax credits that affect mostly low-income people. so that will be on the table. but, you know, the republicans, the disdain that i have seen for poor people, from people who are struggling, like senior citizens on medicare and social security, for low-income people and the women, infant, and children program, we saw the republicans last week vote to spending cuts that would literally take food out of the mouths of hungry babies and in this country, you want to talk about crisis, fiscal crisis, et cetera, a crisis is that one out of five american children is hungry at some point during the year. that is just immoral. and they voted to even cut that. and so i agree with you. i think we have to talk about the consequences for real people. middle class, and as the president said tonight, those who aspire to the middle class. and that would include the unemployed right now, and we're going to extend unemployment insurance benefi
institutions or any other educator at any level. it is more conducive working hand in hand with communities and that is where i stand in coming here today. >> congressmen elijah cummings said the board's decision was a done deal and said he was looking forward to a more diplomatic process where the public could have a say. >> i think we have a great board. 15 very dedicated people trying to make the right decision. we will hear from dr. wilson and make the best decision in the interest of the university. >> we have some good news tonight for the ports up and down the east coast in the retailers to depend on them. the possible strike that could a crippled the cargo economy will not happen for at least another 30 days. 11 news has been keeping an eye on the negotiations. federal mediators say that the union has agreed to extend their contract until at least midnight january 28th. the work stoppage would have idled shipments of a huge range of consumer products from electronics to clothing. now to the fiscal cliff hanger. three more days and then tax hikes on everyone, automatic spending cuts,
education, research and investments in infrastructure will also take a big hit. but my next guest says that our defense department is in a much better position to endure a hit like that. lawren lawrence korb joins me in washington. he's former assistant secretary of defense. doctor, thanks for being with us. >> nice to be with you. >> you say the defense department can afford budget cuts but many are going to worry this is going to somehow undermine our national security. what do you say? >> i have to say compared to where we were, we are talking about the base birnlgt the war budget is funded separately, talking about where we were on 9/11 and where we are now the defense budget has almost doubled so we can easily absorb the cuts and the cuts we propose, $100 billion over the next decade you will bring you back to where you were in real terms in 2010, which is higher than what we spent on average in the cold war and even higher than at the peak of the raegen buildup, an administration i was privileged to serve in. >> in the article i read, you laid out four points, how to cut, as you
. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
, obviously, let's say something passes through the senate. the guess would be, or the educated guess is that it's going to then win a large majority of democratic votes, but because you still are in the minority, you would need 20, 25 -- i'm kind of back of the notebook sketching here, but somewhere around that -- of republicans. i'd assume that you've had conversations either this week, last week, weeks before, with some of these folks. do you believe there are two dozen republicans that, let's say john boehner lets this bill come up. do you believe there are two dozen republicans who vote for it? >> i do believe that there are at least two dozen who would vote for the kind of agreement that we're hearing about being put together in the senate. you know, of course, tom cole, a very conservative member from oklahoma, was urging his colleagues some time ago to get this behind them at the $250,000 threshold. so, i certainly think that there are that number of republicans who would vote for it. the question is, if it's in that range, if we're talking about only about 25 or so republican
to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down
him to take on this mission, he had already had sort of a graduate level education if you will in howards are fought in the desert and that separated him in many ways from his four star contemporaries who were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to h
. let's remember now, we have seen this year education budgets cut. we don't have money to give teachers raises. we had a teachers strike in chicago. we don't have money to do things that teachers need, but we'll find money to arm them, to train them, to buy them guns, ammunition. what are we saying? so we can arm teachers, but we can't give teachers money to give them the ability to be better educators? to me that's the wrong message to send. >> two sides are looking for meaningful contributions. the fact there was a gun buy-back program, the day after christmas, 1500 rifles and handguns were taken back by police in exchange for groceries and a cash back program there in los angeles. hugely successful. meanwhile, arizona's attorney general is proposes a voluntary programs where schools would arm at least one staff member. meanwhile, there's a gun group in utah offers a free concealed weapons course to public schoolteachers today. as we look for federal solution for this, and answers from our elected leaders, is it really the onus being on the local school districts right now to protect
in our people, invested in the infrastructure, invested in education, and at the same time said we can find cuts in other areas and we can raise taxes on those who are doing very well. what happened with that fair and balanced approach? what happened, the greatest prosperity in modern history. 23 million jobs, no more deficit, we got to a balanced budget, and i remember saying to my husband, what is going to happen -- it will not be any more government bonds because we will be out of the debt situation. we saw it on the horizon. when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back on rates across the board to the wealthiest to the middle to the poor and he put to ban all wars on a credit card and we are where we are -- to banwo isa credit card and here we are. we are coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult -- led by unfortunately some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulson, can you please explain the role of derivative ofs to me and what happened
education, all that stuff. they don't care about that. they spend the money on what they want to get elected. >> when you're saying that the previous mayor spent all the money, you're talking about mayor daly. rahm emanuel is in place now. >> right. >> he spent all the money on what? and then, two, what is the realistic proposal here to reverse the violence? >> well, over 20 years i can give you a laundry list of corruption and cronyism. but you know it well because you were here as well. and you saw it. there was a reporter once for "time" doing a cnn profile, comparing richard daly to andy of maybury and said he presides over chicago like andy of maybury. now that reporter is the press secretary for president obama. so there had been -- not you, obviously, but there had been people who were papering over and smooching up and making things look nice when they weren't nice. the city is broke. we're a thousand police officers down, at least, right? and now the city is creating this news flap, public relations issue, saying there is now we're going to take one off the 500 and make it 499. you'
for months and years. i make plans for education in 2001 for the dutch government. i always follow something for inspiration. i saw last time that the democrats and republicans, the parties, they are working so good together to make something happen. host: you think the fiscal cliff debate is a good sign for the country? caller: absolutely, it is a good sign for the country. you know, america does not need money. america is money. america needs jobs. what kind of jobs? american jobs. what is on american jobs? to do the best and to bring the best things. that is the mayor, -- the america that i see. i seek some unity. i travel around the world. i see some the young americans everywhere. they become the best. host: from manitoba, canada, thank you so much for calling in. a few other stories we want to run through for you -- we will continue this discussion into the next segment. here is the story on federal workers getting a pay raise -- another story at what point you to, this from "the new york times" -- one other story i wanted to point out this morning, this from the new york daily news --
educators feel about giving teachers firearms training? bob hinky is a principal at mountain crest high school. how do you feel about this? >> well, i think the teachers have that right and so i feel like it's okay, but i have some things i'm very concerned about. i personally wouldn't carry a gun or get a concealed weapon myself. the concerns i have is the concealed weapons, i have a friend who just received his a couple of years ago and through the training, they never used a gun and had a gun in the class. i worry about the training that they have to actually fire the firearm and to use it. without endangering others as well. so there things i'm concerned about, having a concealed weapon on campus of course is -- we have strict policies that relate to that to ensure everyone is safe and a teacher if they violated that policy because they don't want to put others at risk either. >> what about having the weapon in school and having a kid possibly have access to it. that opens the door for accidents. >> absolutely. that's one of the concerns. so our policy is that it has to be concealed
and neither highly educate and both of them made a very good living, but as a twist, when we look at labor, we have to look at how inclusive the labor unions are, and how much they advocate for people across race and gender, and we have to look at the strategy of labor unions in terms of is it about broadening the numbers of people who are participating in unios s or it is about protecting the interest of the feem who already have union membership? that is a critical case where when you talk about expanding the role of unions, you have to also talk about expanding the ranks of unions, because that is sometimes going to cut against the grain of cheollective bargaining rank for existing members, so without overcomplicating the things, we have to be aware that the overall percentage of american workers who have been unionized is slhrinking in part because o the destabilization of the market that is not educated. >> and the role of the union is a way to go broad and deep. and lord knows that the best paying jobs have nothing to do with having a ph.d. and stay right, there because we want to stay i
in the country, is opposed to this. teachers don't go to school and learn how to educate little children so they can become sharpshooters. and they don't want to go to a workplace where they're in danger of being mowed down. we need to do something to actually protect schools from being shootout zones. and this proposal is just not serious. and it's too bad because i remember actually, professor dyson, when you yourself said let's give the nra a chance because this was this terrible shocked silence after this tragedy, where the whole country was grief-stricken and thinking what's the plan? what are we going to do? because we can't live this way. and so they come back and this is the plan? this is ridiculous. >> yeah, more than ridiculous, to be sure. so a teacher in oregon made an interesting point in support of arming faculty. here's what she said about getting a gun. >> i don't think guns in a school system will ever be very palatable. i also think that we need to give teachers an opportunity to buy some time. whether that's with, you know, district-issued pepper spray, maybe a taser, som
was educated at yale university and yale law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the awful immediacy of his war experiences made him a man who was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of war, he worked as "newsweek" magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr. who asked him to manage the merchandise mart in chicago. during those chicago years, he married the boss' daughter, eunice, in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board and the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city's schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon led to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served as kennedy's chair for illinois and also headed the campaign's civil rights division. in that capacity late in the campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone coret
part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answering that, i am going to focus on word that you said. you said cultivate. the point i have tried to make is that if things are going around in the world outside of the kid's community, outside of his local interface and outside of his school, if he sees wonderful progress happen, that is so different -- that is
. gregg: what do you think? >> i think i want to go after the whole legal educational complex. as a legal employer myself i can tell you that my heart goes out to anyone graduating law school right now. mr. sullivan wants to say that they are providing you a legal education, a socratic-type experience, that's fine. put that on the brochure. have it in big letters when you get the nice gloss see brochure and say look, we are not here providing you with the skills you need to actually pay back this $250,000 in debt we'll saddle you werement we are providing you with an educational experience and let the cards fall where they may. it's absolutely an ethical problem. to realize how wrong this is look at what goes on in medical schools. you don't see thousands of medical students graduating medical school with no prospect of employment. if the medical schools can calibrate the number of admission slots to the need for doctors why can't the a ba do the exact same thing. gregg: i did teach a law school class and what they represented to their students, and truth there is no resemblance. >> the d
? oh, you so got it made. ♪ at subway now you can get 4 box tops for education on 70 general mills products. 4 more box tops... so we can help our schools even more. that's 84 box tops! [ female announcer ] get 4 box tops, now only a walmart. >>> this is a news 4 news break. >> good morning, everyone. it's 7:26 on monday, december 3 31. a rough morning on the roads. alexis davies is here with all you need to know. >> we have good news on the roadways. all of the oubd lanes on the memorial bridge have been re-opened. there was an earlier accident that shut them down. it's been cleared out of the roadway and has been re-opened. a live look now at the beltway. the inner and outer loop looking good. you're looking at an 11-minute drive time. >> we have breaking news from montgomery county. you're looking live at chopper 4 video where teams are rescuing two hunters who were stranded after their boat floated away in toby town. both are doing okay. new this morning fairfax county police are investigating a deadly crash. a tractor-trailer and a car collided on sully near route 66 west befo
, invested in education, and at the same time said we can find cuts in other areas and we can raise taxes on those who are doing very well. what happened with that fair and balanced approach? what happened, the greatest prosperity in modern history. 23 million jobs, no more deficit, we got to a balanced budget, and i remember saying to my husband, what is going to happen -- it will not be any more government bonds because we will be out of the debt situation. we saw it on the horizon. when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back on rates across the board to the wealthiest to the middle to the poor and he put to ban all wars on a credit card and we are where we are -- two is on a credit card and here we are. we are coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult -- led by unfortunately some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulson, can you please explain the role of derivative ofs to me and what happened and how we got into this crisis? he put his head
educating them. with that said, i'm concerned about investors in general not really understanding what they have, and if interest rates go up, even a small amount, there could be negative rates of returns on securities or funds and how will they react, particularly in an environment where there's a potential for less liquidity. dagen: washington, as they have in the past, pardon the language, screws things up, though, then the fed a likely to stay accommodative; right? in the coming year, do you think? >> they absolutely are. i think it's probably, at least near term, the right policy. my concern is if inflation unexpectedly rises for some reason, will they be quick enough to pull away all the enormous liquidity in the market place? they feel they can, but we have seen instances before in the past 20-30 # years where that's not been the case, and it's going to be pretty hard to figure out so, to me, that's one of the bigger, longer term issues not to come into play, at least through much of 2013. dagen: bob, really quickly, what do you like owning right now? what helps you sleep? what
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
as history. just educational to americans. >> well, it's fascinating, isn't it? it's like an epic inside baseball movie because it doesn't take the piece of lincoln's life that we're most familiar with. instead, the civil war is almost done. and here is a man who is weighing how to translate this horrible, horrible war and the emancipation proclamation, freeing the slaves and how to turn it into policy, government policy, to say that all things are equal under the law. so you watch this movie and it makes you think lincoln wasn't just some guy who sat on a pedestal. he was a guy out there playing hardball. he had these three lobbyists in the film. i wish we could take -- >> no, they were on the fiscal cliff. >> the fiscal cliff guys and it says -- >> no, they're the best lobbyists i've seen. it showed that the democratic party of that day were pretty were copperheads. they were playing ball with the war ending saying that they could let the south keep slavery. >> right. and you know everything didn't really change until the so-called southern strategy. i had to keep doing back flips in m
of support for arming educators. i want to throw up the gallup poll. 64% of americans agree with you. arming one school official would be effective. a poll taken shows 54% of americans view the the national rifle association in a favorable light. so the idea of putting some fire power in schools seems to be gaining traction, but my question to you is why stop there? why not focus on some additional gun control, as well, perhaps extending waiting periods and limiting ammunition and a ban on semiautomatics. can you see those in addition to arming teachers, as well? >> if i thought that banning a specific type of firearm would help, i would be all for it, but i know for a fact, it doesn't. they have strict gun control laws in connecticut. here in utah, we've been doing this for 12 years and this is nothing new and we have one of the most permissive states for firearms and we haven't had school shootings either. >> you mentioned the ban on specific types of guns. what about banning certain types of ammunition? what about limiting certain types of ammunition, can you see the need in that? no, it'
of budget -- of the deficit, we're literally going to take 1.6 million kids are going to lose education benefits. we've seen 26 states cut education funding. if you wanted as jeechlt amele said, if you want to go after the economy and deficit we got to get people working and the way to do that is we invest in our children. my kids go to public school. title 1, 1 million kids. by the way, 600,000 of those kids are white. 1 million are black and latino. >> there's a lot of issues around the sequester. we'll talk about that with the congressman when we come back. new years clutter is no match for someone with big ideas. with a new project in mind, some how-to knowledge to give us an edge, and more savings down every aisle. it only takes a few twists and turns for those bright ideas to make the new year even brighter. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. start fresh and save with hdx 20 gallon totes, a special buy at just $5.88 a piece. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world da
. rallying. educating and registering people to vote across the country on election day. these were the striking pictures. lines as long as seven hours. but voters made sure to have their voices heard. the resolve of the american people determined the direction we wanted this nation to go. not everyone had an easy time accepting the news though. >> do you believe that ohio has been settled? >> no, i don't. >> so you're not saying that obama isn't going to win. >> i think this is premature. we've got a quarter of the vote. >> we won't forget carl roves epic on-air melt down. i guess that's what happens when you blow $300 million trying to winn win an election. the republicans money machine, 2012 was simply the year the rich couldn't buy. and it was a year full of wins, none bigger than this. >> the bottom line here is the supreme court has upheld the health care case. >> well, we have a health care law in tact. >> obama care unheld. a day to remember. and on issue after issue, progressives fought back. after 32 straight defeats at the ballot box, marriage equality won in reign. won i
and initiatives that help shape education technology over the past generation. senator rockefeller, who was privileged to work with on so many issues, with doggedly determined to enact this benchmark initiative. in typical fashion, he was not going to take no for an answer which made us it perfect coauthors as i was equally determined. by working with members of both parties were willing to judge on the merits, we overcame the hurdles and the program was born. during the 2001 tax debate, senator blanche lincoln and i, as members of the finance committee, joined together to increase the amount of the child tax credit and make it refundable so that they could still benefit from the credit. ultimately, the measure was enacted becoming the second refundable tax credit ever and in ensuring the child tax credit would exist with an additional 13 million more children and with 500,000 of them out of poverty. madam president, i also think about my friend, senator landrieu, sitting in the chamber roswell and how we formed the senate common ground coalition again to rekindle cross-party relations.
-time care. pokes in this country are committed to education and educating their children. the last thing they want to go is child care. but they're going to more part-time care. that creates a different view to our franchise owners and how they hire people and hours that they can provide to staff that they're limiting. >> greg, am i wrong in saying that i would assume if you're in the bookkeeping business, this on a short-term basis has to be a good thing? >> it actually is a great thing. yeah, we hit the market in two different areas. one, we obviously offer an opportunity for a group or individual to get into the business and start a career or wealth builder. but obviously, we have a touch with the end users, the 30 plus million around the u.s. and soon to be canada, as well. and supplying that small business owner with not only a bookkeeping service, but also data and analytics to help them run the business and make some business decisions as they grow. >> now, you're a franchise model. if, for example, whether it's dividends or capital gains and that goes up, does that change the gam
, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> they are deadly weapons of war no one expects to see on the streets of an american city so you can imagine the shock when a gun buyback program in los angeles yielded rocket-propelled grenade launchers. kyung lah, what are you finding out about this story? >> police are saying it's certainly stunning but they are not surprised. this is something that they deal with every day. weapons on the streets of los angeles, certainly very rare that they come across something like this but they are hoping that by showing it it gives americans some pause and perspective. a rocket launcher. not just one but two handed over to police in this week's gun buyback day. shocking? not to police who have seen it before. among the roughly 10,000 citizens since 2009. >> we look like we're in a third world war nation when you see all of these weapons and the question you have to ask is why? >> these were u.s.-made and owned privately a
of them deal with social media, health care, education, gay rights and child safety. on thursday, it is time to make up your mind on the gift that you are not in love with. that is right, national returns day. more than half a million gifts are expected to be returned by the u.s. postal service alone and others are bound to be regifted it ends up. you know who you are. and on friday, the december
plus, he works with animal education all the time. >> how much does this come down to trust is it. >> trust -- as far as trust, this guy here has to know what his animals are. >> can you ever trust these wild animals? they will do what comes naturally? >> they come -- >> never have i wanted to end the show more than i do right now. >> you know what, jack. >> we may never be back. >> it's been an experience. >> i'll shake your hand. >> it's been fascinating. thanks to jack hanna. tune in for jack hanna's wild countdown. that is all for us tonight. i'm going to have a cold shower. good evening. >>> hello, everyone, i'm don lemon, thanks for joining us. we are watching two major stories affecting your world tonight. one the health of the u.s. secretary of state. hillary clinton is in the hospital right now with a blood clot. full details on her condition and prognosis. also tonight, say the words with me here, fiscal cliff. no vote yet, no agreement yet. and not a lot of time left. can you say one more day? we're going to start with the secretary of state, hillary clinton, hospitaliz
the code, freeing up money to invest in things like education. nobody's talking about that anymore. you know, right now they're really struggling to figure out what to do with the tax cuts. and, you know, they're not even talking about the sequester very much anymore, which would -- you know, the tax cuts, they would hurt immediately. and everybody's taxes are going up next year if you're a wage earner one way or another because of the payroll tax holiday expiring. but there's a whole host of issues and they're not going to be able to deal with all of them. it's become very immediate and it looks like the small deal is going to leetch whole bunch of things for them to do next year. >> good point. we'll get to this more later in the show. the taxes are where all the political heat is, but the discussion is actually about the more important things, all of those cut, the structure of our government. we'll discuss this more, annie. steven mentioned his name. coming up, this man may be the most feared man in washington. >> if i went and became a tibetan monk on the top of some mountain somew
, infrastructure, we've got education. >> it's a big list. >> it's time this government acts together, and if we can't get together on this, we are in trouble all the way. >> all right. my governors, thanks very much and have a really happy new year. >> thanks, karen. >>> coming up, it's not just the fiscal cliff. the president has a lot to do and not a lot of time to do it. stay with us. >> the president goes off 18 hours on the golf course, 20 hours in the air. how do you view this politically? >> he's been using this, and i must say with great skill and ruthless skill and success to fracture and basically shatter the republican opposition. we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or the
the more reason why he has to use the bully pulpit, to educate the country on a holistic approach. he has to get out of the white house more. he should take a train and go around the country and talk to people about all of these issues so you can mobilize public sentiment. as lincoln said, without it nothing can happen. and that's the goal of the second term. >> i think the gun question, though, is almost less a question of presidential leadership and cultural leadership from people like tom and like me. we are the only two gun owners here. david, i know -- >> the pen. >> -- the pen. but if you're a moderate, if you're a quail hunter or dove hunter, you have to get into this and say, look, assault weapons are not what this is about. as president clinton said, he had never known anyone that needed an assault weapon to kill a deer. and this is a case where if people, if this is not an organic movement from the country, it's not going to work. it can't come from top down. >> i want to inject the larger political point. we have midterm elections coming up in two years. he's talking about immi
safety. decent education. you can't do those only through the private sector. >> let me ask you quickly, i'd like to use your perspective in 30-plus years you've been in congress, and this is the least productive congress ever. i'm sure i don't need to tell you the numbers but it's 219 bills passed, some of them pretty much inconsequential. i think the previous low number of bills passed was 333. how do you think we got to this point? how did we get to the edge of the fiscal cliff and the least productive congress in history? >> the public is implicated in this. 2008 the public elected president obama, democratic house, democratic senate. 2010, a large number of people in the public changed their minds they got angry at us over health care, which was misunderstood, angry at us because we inherited a section that we weren't able to defeat because of their obstruction. in 010 -- in most democracies that would be it. we have a constitution under which it's called the staggered powers, checks and balances, the last three elections are there. the problem is in 2008 you had one group of peopl
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